In Our Annual Appeal We Ask a Big Question: Why is Art Important, Especially Now?

If ever you had the opportunity to take an Art History 101 course, you’ll probably remember having read, at some point, “Ways of Seeing” by John Berger—and, hopefully, a certain quote may have stuck with you throughout your course of learning about art:

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Mallary Johnson, Re-Collect III

“The relation between what we see and what we know is never settled. Each evening we see the sun set. We know that the earth is turning away from it. Yet the knowledge, the explanation, never quite fits the sight.”

WarrenMuller

Warren Muller, YB Blue, 2010. Part of the Permanent Collection at Park Towne Place

This quote warms us up towards understanding the role of art. To summarize: art represents reality; poetically, metaphorically, and sometimes literally. The role of the artist is to help us see the world more clearly, as they guide us in coping with unsettling truths, or open our eyes to unrecognized beauty. At the end of the day, artists stand with us at the intersection of knowledge and explanation, guiding us in the direction of understanding. 

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Janos Korodi, motion_picture13, 2015

Being part of a creative culture, we look in the direction of progress. Often difficult with the aggressive gusts of cultural homogenization, progress requires a certain amount of well-lit self-analysis. The ability to see, the ability to appreciate, and giving credence to those who can create metaphoric touchstones for us, is what makes supporting the arts an important call-to-action for us all. Adjusting to an ever-changing environment—with more-than-occasional, unpredictable, plot-twists—gives purpose to the arts: the visualization of a better tomorrow. A strong, and diverse future holds when you empower creative minds to forge new paths. By providing as many ways of seeing and doing as possible, we illuminate healthy chambers of an ever-beating heart. And with a healthy heart, a strong forward-moving society celebrates the diversity of its people, ideas of its innovators, and strength of its future.

For seventeen years, InLiquid has created a myriad of paths for the diverse and creative minds of Philadelphia, and through the unwavering support of our community, continues to do so. As our annual appeal comes during a time appearing to some of us as unfathomable, the cultural community of Philadelphia couldn’t stand stronger without your continued support. In honor of InLiquid’s many achievements, the InLiquid Team has come up with six levels of support, signifying each milestone throughout its seventeen years of dedication to its artist-members, partners, and overall visual arts community of Philadelphia. 

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(left) painting by Constance Culpepper (right)Melissa Maddonni Haims, you repulse me., 2012

We thank our supporters for making these milestones possibly each year, and ask if you can continue to keep the path bright for our artists, and most importantly for our future. In the face of adversity, arts and culture stand strong and proud of its achievements. As it was so wonderfully said by Professor Keating in the film “Dead Poets Society,” he tells us why art exists as he addresses his sophomore classroom. He says, “Medicine, law, business, engineering: these are noble pursuits, and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love: these are what we stay alive for.” And in our annual appeal, InLiquid asks you to help in keeping the heart of creativity continuously and strongly beating.

Give today!

Susan C. Breitsch is a Philadelphia-based artist who uses collage and mixed media to alter found images.
Susan Breitsch
Susan Breitsch

Susan C. Breitsch is a Philadelphia-based artist who uses collage and mixed media to alter found images. …

Susan C. Breitsch is a Philadelphia-based artist who uses collage and mixed media to alter found images. …

Susan C. Breitsch is a Philadelphia-based artist who uses collage and mixed media to alter found images. …

Jack Knight's works are free form compositions shapes, forms and colors that draw the viewer closer to examine the swirls and intricacies and details of the forms and colors.
Jack Knight
Jack Knight

Jack Knight's works are free form compositions shapes, forms and colors that draw the viewer closer to examine the swirls…

Jack Knight's works are free form compositions shapes, forms and colors that draw the viewer closer to examine the swirls and intricacies and details of the forms and colors.…

Jack Knight's works are free form compositions shapes, forms and colors that draw the viewer closer to examine the swirls and intricacies and details of the forms and colors.…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling than about the land as place.” I recognized in this characterization a kindred sensibility that continues to inform my work. I find myself drawn to both the apposition and opposition of natural and human-made elements in landscape photography, and seek to convey the emotional to and fro between timelessness and evanescence.
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling…

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images. There is a compelling irony as I create symbolic toys, which ask to be touched and manipulated, from glass, an extremely fragile material. I manipulate glass, recycle and integrate it with well-worn artifacts from the past, which are often perceived as useless in today's culture. This gives discarded items renewed purpose. As we interact tentatively with these objects they take us back to our most early memories while connecting us to other societies and eras.
Paula Mandel
Paula Mandel

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature…

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images.…

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images. There is a compelling…

Pia De Girolamo is an accomplished painter living and working in the Greater Philadelphia area whose recent exhibitions featured large-scale paintings based on abstracted mountain landscapes, as well as a series evoking the urban landscapes of Rome and Italy.
M. Pia De Girolamo
M. Pia De Girolamo

Pia De Girolamo is an accomplished painter living and working in the Greater Philadelphia area whose recent exhibitions featured…

Pia De Girolamo is an accomplished painter living and working in the Greater Philadelphia area whose recent exhibitions featured large-scale paintings based on abstracted mountain landscapes, as well as…

Pia De Girolamo is an accomplished painter living and working in the Greater Philadelphia area whose recent exhibitions featured large-scale paintings based on abstracted mountain landscapes, as well as a series evoking the…

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