In the Spirit of Giving – Start With Some Art, End With a Smile!

There’s nothing quite like the gift of giving. For our 2017 Annual Fundraiser, we encouraged our audience to actively immerse into the arts while simultaneously giving back by starting, enhancing, and celebrating their art collections together with the arts-and-culture community of Philadelphia. As we go into the holidays and enter our Annual Appeal and the #SeasonOfSmiles, we continue to encourage you to add to your art collection and strengthen the arts of Philadelphia by supporting its many visual artists. Giving original art as a gift to your loved ones is one of the many unique ways to give this year and adding InLiquid Art to your list! 

In return, we promise to give you a wholesome year of art programming filled with new artist exhibitions, artist talks, and workshops at our engaging and beautiful spaces here in Philadelphia, and a revamped Art For the Cash Poor to look forward to this summer. Here are two ways to give this holiday season: start with some art, and give with a Smile!

 

Start With Some Art
Until the end of November, original artwork on our Benefit’s auction site is still available for purchase. Created by our city’s talented visual artists, the gift of handmade prints, paintings, and sculpture are an elegant way of adding value (both sentimental and fiscal) to you or your loved one’s home. Here are a few pieces by Philly’s in-demand artists that can still be yours.

Miriam Singer: Fairmount Electric 2, 2015, pencil, ink, marker, monotype on paper, 13” x 10”

 

 

Miriam Singer’s Fairmount Electric 2 is perfect for any Philly native or lover of city-life. If you know anyone who enjoys the hustle and inner-workings of a city, its colorful cityscapes, and skies, this piece is meant to be. Miriam’s work can also be seen publicly with her public art projects with Mural Arts!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margery Amdur: Hardly A Remnant #2, 2016, mixed-media on canvas, 30” x 26”

A piece of Margery Amdur’s Amass series is a thrill to add to any art collection. This piece is part of a much larger scale of work by Margery, as she has created over sixty mixed media installations, both in Philadelphia and internationally. Known for her innovative use of everyday materials, the construction of these pieces often involves her students and outside community members. For the lover of community-based art, rich colors, upcycled material, and appreciation for public art installation, having this in your home is such splendor. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A powerful piece that offers unity and cultural exploration, Didier William’s Cinched at the Waist is part of a series of prints from his newest body of work. Having once explained that, “he didn’t choose to be an artist, but that art found him and he was always compelled to make art,” his coy yet complex narratives unfurl to offer multiple histories, those fixed and fluid, rigid and supple, diasporic and rooted. The paintings themselves reflect this resistance to classification. 

 

 

 

Give with a Smile: an AmazonSmile! 
If the gift of art is too big a gesture, there is a simpler way to give. The easiest way to help InLiquid is simply by including us with your purchases from Amazon! With AmazonSmile, every purchase you make on Amazon, AmazonSmile gives a small percentage of your purchase to us, counting it as a donation from you. It is a simple three-step process to shop with AmazonSmile. Visit smile.amazon.com, enter InLiquid Art + Design as your non-profit of choice, and then continue to shop as you normally would! The best part: you can continue to do this all year!

Donate to our Annual Appeal 

At InLiquid, we take tremendous pride in how our organization works with artists to breathe creativity into the life of our city. This year, there is a lot to be proud of! In 2017, we mounted 56 exhibition events, and supported more than 300 artist members. Your contribution to InLiquid Art + Design’s 2017 Annual Appeal will enable us to make a greater impact on artists and Philadelphia’s cultural community in 2018. 

For more unique ways to gift and give with InLiquid, stay tuned for more holiday inspired blog posts throughout the month! 

 

Cassidy Argo
Cassidy Argo
Carla J Fisher uses thread and throwaways to symbolize how even the tired, used, and totally spent can experience new life. Through free motion machine embroidery, she seeks the viewer’s visceral response of surprise as they realize the sculptured material is simply thread.
Carla J Fisher
Carla J Fisher

Carla J Fisher uses thread and throwaways to symbolize how even the tired, used, and totally spent can experience new life.…

Carla J Fisher uses thread and throwaways to symbolize how even the tired, used, and totally spent can experience new life. Through free motion machine embroidery, she seeks the viewer’s visceral response…

Carla J Fisher uses thread and throwaways to symbolize how even the tired, used, and totally spent can experience new life. Through free motion machine embroidery, she seeks the viewer’s visceral response of surprise as they…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.
Stan Smokler
Stan Smokler

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.…

Stuart Lehrman's  practice involves dialogue between order and chaos. Constantly experimenting with the physical properties of paint,  between adding and subtracting, making and unmaking, working to a place where he loses control of the painting and then struggling back to achieve the right balance between wild spontaneity and emotional restraint.
Stuart Lehrman
Stuart Lehrman

Stuart Lehrman's practice involves dialogue between order and chaos. Constantly experimenting with the physical properties…

Stuart Lehrman's practice involves dialogue between order and chaos. Constantly experimenting with the physical properties of paint, between adding and subtracting, making and unmaking, working to a…

Stuart Lehrman's practice involves dialogue between order and chaos. Constantly experimenting with the physical properties of paint, between adding and subtracting, making and unmaking, working to a place where he loses…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the slow movement of rain laden clouds. Areas of sky, water, and land are knit together with brushstrokes to represent their seamless interaction under the common conditions of weather and time. In my acid etched tin pieces, areas of watery marks are left visible to suggest the underlying layers of the landscape. I  do not strive to recreate the particulars of  places that inspire me, but rather the timelessness of the elements of light, weather, and geometries that inform them. My work is not about how the landscape looks as much as about how the landscape makes me feel. I try to create an image that allows the viewer to engage with it in such a way as to invite similar introspection.
Kirby Fredendall
Kirby Fredendall

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the…

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