Go Mad for Books at AFTCP16


michelle-headshot

On June 13 and 14, from noon – 6 pm, InLiquid presents Art for the Cash Poor 16. This year, Go Mad for Art as the three-day event includes all the elements that drive us crazy-in-love with Philadelphia’s creative sector. Over 100 arts vendors will be twisting every medium imaginable into jewelry, photography, printmaking, graphic art, painting, sculpture, and more.

Michelle Ciarlo-Hayes spent her childhood rifling through closets, searching for the right door to Narnia. Now, she creates her own doors into other worlds, by salvaging old, abandoned books and giving them new life as art.

Could you tell me a bit about your arts background?

Creative writing and English literature are my official background – other than the odd class here and there, I never formally studied art, but rather always loved creating and working with my hands – be it with a camera, a brush, or a needle and thread – from a very early age.

You spent your childhood looking for Narnia. How do you go about finding magical worlds for artistic inspiration as an adult?

As a child, I did indeed think an entrance to Narnia was waiting for me – I laugh when I think of how often I’d go rifling through my grandmother’s closets, hoping it would be her house that would provide the portal. For me, the magic still comes from literature: perhaps it’s a book I’m reading to my children, or it’s a poem I’m reading for myself, but beautiful words always make images pop into my head, and then I’ll quickly sketch out that idea in my notebook that I carry everywhere.

book

As a librarian, you collected damaged books and took them home with you. Do you think it’s a similar impulse that drives people to collect art – a sense that artwork – like books for a bookworm – has personality?

I love the idea that art has personality! That’s absolutely spot-on: I think we always seek to surround ourselves with objects that speak to us. Not only do I love creating my artwork, I also love incorporating these wonderful old books (that would otherwise be recycled) because the personality of the two work so beautifully together.

Do you have any upcoming exhibits or projects?

I’m a member of a wonderful collective called MamaCITA (which stands for “A Mother’s Cooperative in the Arts) (http://mamacitaarts.com) and we just closed a gorgeous show and installation called “Re.Collection” at the Cheltenham Center for the Arts. I’m also thrilled to have contributed artwork to the book “Extraordinary Gifts” recently published by Philadelphia Stories, honoring influential women from the Delaware Valley.

Can you tell me a little about the work you will have for sale at Art for the Cash Poor 16?

The MKC Photography table will be full! I’ll have my throw pillows and table runners, as well as my salvaged wood art blocks, keychains, and ornaments, many of which will feature artwork I’ve just recently created. If you’re wondering how I make those salvaged-wood-and-book-paper pieces, you can see a short video here:

Have you participated previously in AFTCP? If so what was your impression?

This is actually my 6th year at AFTCP, and it is by far my favorite event in the city. The music is amazing, the food is delicious, and my fellow artisans are so talented and fun – some of my table neighbors have become dear friends over the years. I also love that it’s open to everyone: come with friends, bring your kids, bring your dog – all are welcome.

What are you looking forward to the most about this year’s AFTCP?

The bands. Every year I ask for the same spot: right at the doorway, nearest the music. It’s such a fun spot to be for the whole weekend – I can’t even call it work!

The weekend-long fair invites attendees to navigate the Crane Arts space, which will be bursting with art vendors, live musical performances, culinary curiosities, and an outdoor beer garden. The addition of a Friday night ticketed preview party on June 12, 5:30 – 9 pm, serves as a meet-and-greet with the artists and a fundraiser for AIDS Fund, offering guests an exclusive sneak-peek at the festivities to follow. More details, including a full list of bands and participating artists, at the link.

Joe Vescovich's pieces are full of texture, layers and depth that can and need to be walked around and viewed form different points and perspectives. He engages the viewer to be active in the experience by encouraging interaction from differing perspectives. Many of his pieces have hints of sculptural qualities that pop from the wall. This creates shadows and movement within and outside of the piece.
Joe Vescovich
Joe Vescovich

Joe Vescovich's pieces are full of texture, layers and depth that can and need to be walked around and viewed form different…

Joe Vescovich's pieces are full of texture, layers and depth that can and need to be walked around and viewed form different points and perspectives. He engages the viewer to be active in the experience…

Joe Vescovich's pieces are full of texture, layers and depth that can and need to be walked around and viewed form different points and perspectives. He engages the viewer to be active in the experience by encouraging interaction…

The intentional physicality of my paintings is as much a result of my dialogue throughout the process as it is the means with which I invite viewers to experience the work viscerally. Iconography may be the entry point for viewers, but the essence of the elements and ambiguity demand individual interaction with each painting. Layering is both revealing and concealing, creating a balanced tension and suspension which is really what painting is for me. I use the elements to speak for me and I wish to open doors to new dialogue within and between viewers.
Kelly Gadsby
Kelly Gadsby

The intentional physicality of my paintings is as much a result of my dialogue throughout the process as it is the means…

The intentional physicality of my paintings is as much a result of my dialogue throughout the process as it is the means with which I invite viewers to experience the work viscerally. Iconography may be…

The intentional physicality of my paintings is as much a result of my dialogue throughout the process as it is the means with which I invite viewers to experience the work viscerally. Iconography may be the entry point for…

Heather Ossandon, a ceramist who works in both the functional and decorative arts. Her work explores both the rituals of the everyday and special occasions.
Heather Ossandon
Heather Ossandon

Heather Ossandon, a ceramist who works in both the functional and decorative arts. Her work explores both the rituals of…

Heather Ossandon, a ceramist who works in both the functional and decorative arts. Her work explores both the rituals of the everyday and special occasions.…

Heather Ossandon, a ceramist who works in both the functional and decorative arts. Her work explores both the rituals of the everyday and special occasions.…

Carol Taylor-Kearney is an artist, arts educator, and curator.
Carol Taylor-Kearney (Curatorial)
Carol Taylor-Kearney (Curatorial)

Carol Taylor-Kearney is an artist, arts educator, and curator. …

Carol Taylor-Kearney is an artist, arts educator, and curator. …

Carol Taylor-Kearney is an artist, arts educator, and curator. …

By enabling the viewer to experience the emotional reality of the subjects Deborah Caiola paints, she attempts to challenge assumptions and mainstream beliefs, and celebrate that which unites us as humans.
Deborah Caiola
Deborah Caiola

By enabling the viewer to experience the emotional reality of the subjects Deborah Caiola paints, she attempts to challenge…

By enabling the viewer to experience the emotional reality of the subjects Deborah Caiola paints, she attempts to challenge assumptions and mainstream beliefs, and celebrate that which unites us as humans.…

By enabling the viewer to experience the emotional reality of the subjects Deborah Caiola paints, she attempts to challenge assumptions and mainstream beliefs, and celebrate that which unites us as humans.…

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