Rebecca Schultz Leading Women’s Responses to the Ecological Crisis: A Performative Ritual

Rebecca Schultz is leading Women’s Responses to the Ecological Crisis: A Performative Ritual from January 1 – May 17, 2020.

There will be two information sessions for this project. One on Saturday February 22nd from 1-3 pm, and one on Wednesday March 11th from 6-8 pm.

Update from Rebecca Schultz regarding the project’s future during the COVID-19 pandemic:

“The physical closeness that is needed to create an ensemble performance piece is not possible right now, but the need to connect in whatever ways we can, and reflect on our relationship with nature, is more important than ever. I recently contributed a short story to the Artists and Climate Change blog about just that.

So, starting April 1st, I am launching a new version of this project which will unfold on social media, that everyone is invited to participate in, regardless of geographic location and gender identity. To get involved, please follow the project blog, as well my Instagram feed and Facebook page.

Samantha Nicole Billig
Samantha Nicole Billig
Influenced by folklore, superstition, divination, & forgotten territories reclaimed by nature, I create immersive installations out of hand-cut Tyvek—a nonwoven material most familiar as an insulating wrap used in the construction industry. These environments might be fairy-tale forests or the sites of biological disasters. Perhaps both.
Summer J. Hart
Summer J. Hart

Influenced by folklore, superstition, divination, & forgotten territories reclaimed by nature, I create immersive installations…

Influenced by folklore, superstition, divination, & forgotten territories reclaimed by nature, I create immersive installations out of hand-cut Tyvek—a nonwoven material most familiar as an insulating…

Influenced by folklore, superstition, divination, & forgotten territories reclaimed by nature, I create immersive installations out of hand-cut Tyvek—a nonwoven material most familiar as an insulating wrap used in the construction…

Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century modernism to make dynamic, retrofuturist wooden wall sculptures that evoke nostalgia for the past as much as they look to the future. Fascinated by the way pieces of technology, culture, and design reveal their age, Scott aims to make works that cannot be pinned to a specific era.  By utilizing new and reclaimed wood, metal, plastics and other materials, Scott's mixed media sculptural work defies normal classification.
Scott Troxel
Scott Troxel

Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century…

Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century modernism to make dynamic, retrofuturist wooden wall sculptures that evoke nostalgia…

Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century modernism to make dynamic, retrofuturist wooden wall sculptures that evoke nostalgia for the past…

Kaitlin Santoro
Kaitlin Santoro
Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.
Stan Smokler
Stan Smokler

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.…

previous arrow
next arrow