If You Had Something to Say to Our Climate, I Want to Know

Edited 1/15/18

As part of my InLiquid Exhibition at The Courtyard by Marriot, Mother Earth, I’d like to address our climate—and I invite you to join me in the conversation. It is a call to unite with our climate, befriend it, become one with it. In the sense that we are all connected, we are also connected to our climate; we are one.
I’ve been giving much thought to how can we protect our planet, our Earth, our Mother, and in particular, how to educate those who deny climate change and the adverse effects of humanity on our environment. It strikes me that for starters we can begin talking to the climate, directly, like we talk to ourselves, (often silently), about so many things. If we stop seeing the climate and ourselves as separate, perhaps we’ll have more compassion for the climate itself, and by extension, ourselves.

What parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, neighbor, or teacher wants to see their next generation live in a toxic environment? What adult wants their next generations to be pushed from their homes by rising floodwaters or consumed by health problems such as asthma and bronchitis because of unhealthy air pollution? What person wants to suffer severe food allergies because of chemicals in wheat, tomatoes, and strawberries? Who wants to experience a loss of species so great they will never see white rhinos, mountain gorillas or the spectacular beauty of underwater coral–or any animal we have seen in our lifetime?

So, how can we start talking to the climate? And what better time to share our thoughts than right now? I invite you to please write a note today.Write about the mistakes we’ve made in our thinking, sorrow for what we have done, promises to do better, goals to become active in any climate protection organization. Write requests for information, intentions to becoming better informed, commitments to acting with love and empathy for our Mother Earth. Your only limit is your imagination, so think big! Take the earth and the climate personally!
Let us start right now, with a personal letter to our Climate. Together, we’ll see where it takes us.

Take a look at the responses so far!

Dear Climate,
I’ve been meaning to tell you…

“…Our economic model is based on the use of fossil fuels. We went to war in Vietnam for oil, we went to war in Iraq for oil and we continue to support dictators for oil. People like the Koch brothers who own oil refineries, have billions of dollars and do not want their industries to be regulated or taxed, they do not want to pay for the pollution they release into our atmosphere, and they most certainly do not want to see the end of the use of fossil fuels…”

“I am sorry for all the plastic I’ve consumed throughout the years, and all the times I have thrown plastic in the trash out of haste. I hope you can forgive me. I have put into practice consuming less plastic, using reusable thermoses, straws, and bags every single day!”

“…We have begun to think and act globally, rather than tribally. While there is some backsliding, the overall movement is toward internationalism, political stability, and peace.

We live in a world that our ancestors would not have thought possible — it is a utopia in comparison. And humanity made the changes — sometimes kicking and screaming at best or after the deaths of thousands or millions at worst. We do change in spite of ourselves. So I have hope, and so should we all…”

 

Write Your Open Letter to the Climate! 
View Pamela Tudor’s Mother Earth Exhibition  
 

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