Ann Metzger Memorial National Biennial Exhibition

Ann Metzger Memorial National Biennial Exhibition

deadline: Saturday, October 9, 2021

The Ann Metzger Memorial National Biennial Exhibition is an all-media, all-content, juried exhibition open to artists across the United States. Ann Metzger was a long-time member of the St. Louis Artists’ Guild and per her bequest established a prize fund for cash awards to honor contemporary artists. For this exhibition, we search for and bring together great contemporary artwork from around the nation.

Juror: Jade Powers – Assistant Curator at Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

Jade is an experienced curator with a demonstrated history of working in the museums and institutions industry. Skilled in Art History, Curating, Cross-cultural Competence, Public Speaking, and Writing. Strong arts and design professional with a Master of Arts (M.A.) focused in Religion/Religious Studies from Indiana University Bloomington.

Learn more and apply here.

John Howell White is Professor of Art Education in the Department of Art Education and Crafts at Kutztown University in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. He has an M.F.A. from Pratt Institute and a Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University.
John Howell White
John Howell White

John Howell White is Professor of Art Education in the Department of Art Education and Crafts at Kutztown University in Kutztown,…

John Howell White is Professor of Art Education in the Department of Art Education and Crafts at Kutztown University in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. He has an M.F.A. from Pratt Institute and a Ph.D. from The…

John Howell White is Professor of Art Education in the Department of Art Education and Crafts at Kutztown University in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. He has an M.F.A. from Pratt Institute and a Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State…

Peter Quarracino
Peter Quarracino
I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the slow movement of rain laden clouds. Areas of sky, water, and land are knit together with brushstrokes to represent their seamless interaction under the common conditions of weather and time. In my acid etched tin pieces, areas of watery marks are left visible to suggest the underlying layers of the landscape. I  do not strive to recreate the particulars of  places that inspire me, but rather the timelessness of the elements of light, weather, and geometries that inform them. My work is not about how the landscape looks as much as about how the landscape makes me feel. I try to create an image that allows the viewer to engage with it in such a way as to invite similar introspection.
Kirby Fredendall
Kirby Fredendall

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the…

Halle Ballard
Halle Ballard
Kimberly Camp
Kimberly Camp
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