Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts 2022 Artists-in-Residence

Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts 2022 Artists-in-Residence

This Deadline Expired: Monday, August 16, 2021

For nearly four decades, the core mission of the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts has been to provide artists from around the world with dedicated time, space, and resources to conduct research and create new work.

To that end, the center is accepting applications for its 2022 Artists-in-Residence program. The center is in downtown Omaha, Nebraska’s historic Old Market, and residences feature private live/work studios complete with a kitchen and bathroom and 24-hour access to the expansive installation and production spaces within the center’s 110,000-square-foot main facility and the Okada Sculpture & Ceramics Facility, a 9,000-square-foot sculpture fabrication space and workshop. A Bemis residency also includes complimentary laundry facilities, utilities, Wi-Fi, and access to an on-site research library.

Artists working in disciplines invited to apply include, but are not limited to, the visual arts, media/new genre, performance, architecture, film/video, interdisciplinary arts, sound art, and music composition, and choreography. U.S.-based artists-in-residence receive a $1,000 monthly stipend and an additional $750 travel stipend through the program. Due to the limitations of B2 visas (touring/visiting), international artists-in-residence are eligible to receive reimbursement of qualified expenses such as airfare, ground transportation, and meals.

Although this is a process-based residency, and there is no expectation or promise of an exhibition, artists are invited to participate in at least one opportunity for public presentation. Selected artists must attend a minimum of eight consecutive weeks to receive the award.

To be eligible, artists may not be enrolled in an academic program during their residency.

For complete program guidelines and application instructions, visit the Bemis Center website here

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images. There is a compelling irony as I create symbolic toys, which ask to be touched and manipulated, from glass, an extremely fragile material. I manipulate glass, recycle and integrate it with well-worn artifacts from the past, which are often perceived as useless in today's culture. This gives discarded items renewed purpose. As we interact tentatively with these objects they take us back to our most early memories while connecting us to other societies and eras.
Paula Mandel
Paula Mandel

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature…

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images.…

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images. There is a compelling…

Tommy Mavra
Tommy Mavra
Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century modernism to make dynamic, retrofuturist wooden wall sculptures that evoke nostalgia for the past as much as they look to the future. Fascinated by the way pieces of technology, culture, and design reveal their age, Scott aims to make works that cannot be pinned to a specific era.  By utilizing new and reclaimed wood, metal, plastics and other materials, Scott's mixed media sculptural work defies normal classification.
Scott Troxel
Scott Troxel

Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century…

Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century modernism to make dynamic, retrofuturist wooden wall sculptures that evoke nostalgia…

Scott Troxel draws on the aesthetics of bygone technology and the forward-looking designs of the Atomic Age and mid-century modernism to make dynamic, retrofuturist wooden wall sculptures that evoke nostalgia for the past…

Cheryl Levin
Cheryl Levin
Sam Nejati
Sam Nejati
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