VisArts Call for Submissions: This Moment of Rupture

VisArts Call for Submissions: This Moment of Rupture

This Deadline Expired: Monday, June 7, 2021

“This Moment of Rupture” is a juried national survey of contemporary ceramics today. VisArts is seeking a broad spectrum of works that both celebrate traditional forms and challenge the conventional definitions of craft. During “this moment of rupture” with the related crises of the pandemic, racial uprisings, climate change, and economic decline, how are ceramic artists responding? Is there a renewed sense of emotional purpose? Is activism playing a role in contemporary ceramic practice? VisArts Center is seeking artists who work in an expansive variety of media but that all incorporate ceramics in some way, be it with traditional methods, or with processes such as 3D printing, or as a part of performance art, mixed media and more.

Artists may submit up to 3 works for consideration.

Contact: mkoeppel@visartscenter.org

Submit at: https://visarts.submittable.com/submit

These paintings are a result of an intimate process of creating. These works are meditative, reflective, physical, emotional and spiritual.
TJ Walsh
TJ Walsh

These paintings are a result of an intimate process of creating. These works are meditative, reflective, physical, emotional…

These paintings are a result of an intimate process of creating. These works are meditative, reflective, physical, emotional and spiritual. …

These paintings are a result of an intimate process of creating. These works are meditative, reflective, physical, emotional and spiritual. …

I spend a lot of time in nature observing plants, the environment, and natures cycles. While in or out of the studio, I'm creating both complex and compact environments that enliven personal residences, gallery walls, and city streets. In work ranging from large scale sculptural installations, and living compilations, to miniature assemblage and mixed media works on paper, nature is my rubric and my compass. This is the way I make connections between human interests and the environment that surrounds us. 

Simultaneously, nature is my metaphor and material. Grafting together a variety of flat and dimensional elements is not uncommon in my practice.
In different ways, I'll incorporate earth, vines, flowers, roots, seeds, pigment, and wax into sculpture, and mixed media works on paper, more akin to assemblage. Nature and plants frequently act as metaphors for our human experience as they are passively or overtly layered or stitched amidst found imagery, maps, photographs, and words.
Susan Benarcik
Susan Benarcik

I spend a lot of time in nature observing plants, the environment, and natures cycles. While in or out of the studio, I'm…

I spend a lot of time in nature observing plants, the environment, and natures cycles. While in or out of the studio, I'm creating both complex and compact environments that enliven personal residences,…

I spend a lot of time in nature observing plants, the environment, and natures cycles. While in or out of the studio, I'm creating both complex and compact environments that enliven personal residences, gallery walls, and…

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a LED light or screen and invite participation by the viewer.
Paula Cahill
Paula Cahill

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a…

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a LED light or screen and invite participation by the viewer.…

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a LED light or screen and invite participation by the viewer.…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the slow movement of rain laden clouds. Areas of sky, water, and land are knit together with brushstrokes to represent their seamless interaction under the common conditions of weather and time. In my acid etched tin pieces, areas of watery marks are left visible to suggest the underlying layers of the landscape. I  do not strive to recreate the particulars of  places that inspire me, but rather the timelessness of the elements of light, weather, and geometries that inform them. My work is not about how the landscape looks as much as about how the landscape makes me feel. I try to create an image that allows the viewer to engage with it in such a way as to invite similar introspection.
Kirby Fredendall
Kirby Fredendall

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the…

Rachel Romano
Rachel Romano
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