Editorial Internship

Editorial Internship

deadline: Saturday, December 30, 2023

About this Internship:

The InLiquid Internship Program will offer the experience of working in a nonprofit arts organization. Internships are designed primarily for undergraduate and graduate students, although open to anyone with a strong desire and commitment. Interns will work closely with InLiquid staff and will be involved with regular activities as well as special projects as needed.

The Editorial Intern will work under the supervision of the Membership Coordinator. They will assist with updating and creating pages on current gallery/museum exhibitions; researching member news, activities, and events for website and monthly newsletter; and _. Interns will be exposed to, and integrally involved in, many facets of a nonprofit visual arts organization. The interns will have a unique opportunity to gain expertise in web publication, both on the design end and the editorial end, and will develop an in-depth knowledge of a large and vibrant visual arts community. The ideal candidate will be web-savvy and have a strong interest in contemporary visual arts or art history, have strong writing skills, a keen eye for detail, and a willingness to learn. Experience in WordPress, InDesign/Photoshop, and/or basic HTML is a plus, but not essential.

Hours: This position involves a 3 to 6 month commitment, 12 – 16 hours a week. Hours and days of the week are flexible within InLiquid’s M-F, 10 am – 6 pm work week. While this internship is unpaid, academic credit may be received depending on the intern’s college program.

Responsibilities may include:

Qualifications:

Contact:

Please send a resume highlighting relevant experience, cover letter, and a short writing sample (250-500 words) to Danielle Hanlon at Danielle@inliquid.org. This is not a paid internship but is available for credit with some colleges.

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images. There is a compelling irony as I create symbolic toys, which ask to be touched and manipulated, from glass, an extremely fragile material. I manipulate glass, recycle and integrate it with well-worn artifacts from the past, which are often perceived as useless in today's culture. This gives discarded items renewed purpose. As we interact tentatively with these objects they take us back to our most early memories while connecting us to other societies and eras.
Paula Mandel
Paula Mandel

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature…

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images.…

My interest in glass and found objects has allowed me to re-immerse myself in the world of toys, this time with a more mature twist. As I refer to my most sacred toys, I try to evoke universal images. There is a compelling…

I endeavor to find the connection between math and deliberation with nature and randomness. I employ an experimental approach inspired by urban and natural textures, using geometry, patterns, and contrived shapes to create a lyrical, non-narrative statement. My paintings are colorful, contemporary and abstract, often based on musical frequencies, graffiti, architecture and patterns.
Louis Gribaudo
Louis Gribaudo

I endeavor to find the connection between math and deliberation with nature and randomness. I employ an experimental approach…

I endeavor to find the connection between math and deliberation with nature and randomness. I employ an experimental approach inspired by urban and natural textures, using geometry, patterns, and contrived…

I endeavor to find the connection between math and deliberation with nature and randomness. I employ an experimental approach inspired by urban and natural textures, using geometry, patterns, and contrived shapes to create…

Melanie Serkes is a multidisciplinary sculptor. Inspired by the human form her rhythmic geometric creations abstract the precarious moments that occur between fragility and stability.
Melanie Serkes
Melanie Serkes

Melanie Serkes is a multidisciplinary sculptor. Inspired by the human form her rhythmic geometric creations abstract the…

Melanie Serkes is a multidisciplinary sculptor. Inspired by the human form her rhythmic geometric creations abstract the precarious moments that occur between fragility and stability.…

Melanie Serkes is a multidisciplinary sculptor. Inspired by the human form her rhythmic geometric creations abstract the precarious moments that occur between fragility and stability.…

Libbie Soffer
Libbie Soffer
Howard Silberthau, an abstract artist who strives to capture both the universal nature of things and the pedestrian, oftentimes by utilizing the grid, the repetitive nature of letters, and the stripe.
Howard Silberthau
Howard Silberthau

Howard Silberthau, an abstract artist who strives to capture both the universal nature of things and the pedestrian, oftentimes…

Howard Silberthau, an abstract artist who strives to capture both the universal nature of things and the pedestrian, oftentimes by utilizing the grid, the repetitive nature of letters, and the stripe.…

Howard Silberthau, an abstract artist who strives to capture both the universal nature of things and the pedestrian, oftentimes by utilizing the grid, the repetitive nature of letters, and the stripe.…

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