Lower East Side Printshop Keyholder Residency (New York, NY)

Lower East Side Printshop Keyholder Residency (New York, NY)

This Deadline Expired: Thursday, March 1, 2018

Lower East Side Printshop, New York, offers emerging artists free 24-hour access to printmaking facilities to develop new work and foster their artistic careers. The Keyholder Residency includes free 24/7 access to a large shared studio with printmaking facilities, $1,000 stipend, storage space and basic supplies, exhibition opportunities, educational programming, and support services. Keyholders work independently, in a productive atmosphere alongside other contemporary artists. Artists from all disciplines are eligible to apply; printmaking skills are not required, but some familiarity with the medium is recommended. Basic instruction in printmaking techniques is available for new Keyholders. Technical assistance is not included in the program, but is available at additional cost. For more information about the residency, studio facilities, and to apply online please visit http://www.printshop.org/keyholder-residencies/. There is no application fee to apply!

Participation is competitive. Applications are evaluated by a rotating committee of artists, critics, curators, and art professionals based on the quality of submitted artwork. A total of 8 artists are awarded the residency annually. Artists based in the New York City area and without access to a studio space are encouraged to apply.

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a LED light or screen and invite participation by the viewer.
Paula Cahill
Paula Cahill

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a…

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a LED light or screen and invite participation by the viewer.…

Paula Cahill's abstract paintings, comprised of single continuous meandering lines, often have the luminous quality of a LED light or screen and invite participation by the viewer.…

Christina Massey
Christina Massey
Sandra's colorful and expressive abstract paintings and collages are about "place", and take inspiration from the landscape - While the artworks are not a representation of any specific location, they oftentimes are evocative of landscape. She invites the viewer to engage with her artworks through memory, imagination, and reverie. Working with oil paint, oil pigment sticks, watercolor and other media, her paintings and collages have been described by a curator as “visceral and expressive”.
Sandra Benhaim
Sandra Benhaim

Sandra's colorful and expressive abstract paintings and collages are about "place", and take inspiration from…

Sandra's colorful and expressive abstract paintings and collages are about "place", and take inspiration from the landscape - While the artworks are not a representation of any specific…

Sandra's colorful and expressive abstract paintings and collages are about "place", and take inspiration from the landscape - While the artworks are not a representation of any specific location, they oftentimes…

Diane Szczepaniak
Diane Szczepaniak
In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling than about the land as place.” I recognized in this characterization a kindred sensibility that continues to inform my work. I find myself drawn to both the apposition and opposition of natural and human-made elements in landscape photography, and seek to convey the emotional to and fro between timelessness and evanescence.
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling…

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