RAIR Artists Reimagine What the Rest of Us Throw Away

RAIR Artists Reimagine What the Rest of Us Throw Away

This Deadline Expired: Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Applications for 2019

You can bring your ideas to RAIR, but don’t expect the 3.5-acre construction and demolition waste recycling site that houses the residency to play by your rules. It has about 450 tons of material per day—if you can grab it.  Up to 80 percent of the stuff dumped at Revolution gets recycled, resold, or repurposed: various metals, rubble, drywall, lumber, cardboard, rigid plastic, or the contents of entire houses after a clean-out.

In the space between art and industry, makers and our culture of waste, artists and dump-truck operators. RAIR’s flagship residency program attracts emerging and established artists alike, with two options. The Standard Residency is a studio-based program lasting four to six weeks between March and November for five artists selected annually. For a minimum of 20 hours per week, standard residents get on-site studio and project space, and access to the Tacony waste stream. A smaller-scale residency, the Biggie Shortie, is more project-based. It lasts for two to four weekends, with partial access to the RAIR shop’s tools and equipment, but offers no private studio.

Every residency begins with stringent safety training, Thomé says, staring with what they call “the get-up,” which must be worn by all residents in the yard in all weathers. That means boots, goggles, ventilators, hard hats, and safety vests. Tons of trash is coming and going all day, in a constantly moving battalion of 18-wheelers, dump trucks, front-loaders, and other heavy construction vehicles.

G. Farrel Kellum

G. Kellum challenges the rear view perspective of artistic expression and dives into the world of urban aesthetics, as we…

G. Kellum challenges the rear view perspective of artistic expression and dives into the world of urban aesthetics, as we know it. It also explores the possibilities present in spiritual and psychological…

G. Kellum challenges the rear view perspective of artistic expression and dives into the world of urban aesthetics, as we know it. It also explores the possibilities present in spiritual and psychological practices. Look…

Summer J. Hart

Influenced by folklore, superstition, divination, & forgotten territories reclaimed by nature, I create immersive installations…

Influenced by folklore, superstition, divination, & forgotten territories reclaimed by nature, I create immersive installations out of hand-cut Tyvek—a nonwoven material most familiar as an insulating…

Influenced by folklore, superstition, divination, & forgotten territories reclaimed by nature, I create immersive installations out of hand-cut Tyvek—a nonwoven material most familiar as an insulating wrap used in the construction…

Leah Macdonald

Leah Macdonald's diversity and experience in the realms of photography, encaustic painting and mixed media continue to merge…

Leah Macdonald's diversity and experience in the realms of photography, encaustic painting and mixed media continue to merge and compliment one another.…

Leah Macdonald's diversity and experience in the realms of photography, encaustic painting and mixed media continue to merge and compliment one another.…

Rebecca McGuire Jacob
Michele Tremblay

Michele Tremblay's paper sculptures are informed by her intimate knowledge of flowers gained by working with fresh flowers…

Michele Tremblay's paper sculptures are informed by her intimate knowledge of flowers gained by working with fresh flowers over the years.…

Michele Tremblay's paper sculptures are informed by her intimate knowledge of flowers gained by working with fresh flowers over the years.…

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider