RAUSCHENBERG EMERGENCY GRANTS

RAUSCHENBERG EMERGENCY GRANTS

Ongoing Opportunity

The program provides one-time grants of up to $5,000 for unexpected medical emergencies.

New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) is proud to partner with the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation to administer a new emergency grant program called Rauschenberg Emergency Grants. This marks the first phase of a program that will be in the tradition of Change, Inc., a non-profit foundation established in 1970 by Robert Rauschenberg to assist professional artists of all disciplines in need of emergency medical aid.

The program will provide one-time grants of up to $5,000 for unexpected medical emergencies. The grants are available to visual and media artists and choreographers who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents in the United States, District of Columbia, or U.S. Territories. If you aren’t sure if your artistic discipline fits within these guidelines, please contact the grants administrator.

Please note: Rauschenberg Emergency Grants are not for lost wages. Visit NYFA’s Emergency Grants page for a regularly-updated list of emergency resources.

DEADLINE

There is no deadline; applications will be accepted and reviewed by the panel on a monthly basis beginning in late May/early June 2020

Please note: there is a set amount of funding allocated for these grants each year; once this amount has been awarded we cannot accept additional applications until more funds are made available. Our website will indicate when all funds have been granted.

LEARN MORE HERE

Relationships
(I always say) are never easy:
especially those between
color, shape, texture, space . . .
and tension.
The relationship of the part to the part,
the part to the whole and the relationship
of the piece to the viewer . . . no matter
what materials I use is all important.
I use titles to emotionalize these abstract
pieces to help communicate a connection
between the individual and
the universal whole.

In the metal pieces I use recycled aluminum
printing press plates which I sand,
cut and glue onto wood panels, they are
about energy and light, patterns and
motion, all influenced by the microcosm
of life forms, biology, and a
hint of satire.
Dolores Poacelli
Dolores Poacelli

Relationships
(I always say) are never easy:
especially those between
color, shape, texture, space . . .
and tension.
The…

Relationships
(I always say) are never easy:
especially those between
color, shape, texture, space . . .
and tension.
The relationship of the part to the part,
the part to the whole and the relationship
of…

Relationships
(I always say) are never easy:
especially those between
color, shape, texture, space . . .
and tension.
The relationship of the part to the part,
the part to the whole and the relationship
of the piece…

Bob Ingram
Bob Ingram
Julianna Foster
Julianna Foster
G. Kellum challenges the rear view perspective of artistic expression and dives into the world of urban aesthetics, as we know it. It also explores the possibilities present in spiritual and psychological practices. Look then, look again. As we move toward the future the images grow more familiar with each truth they unveil. This then becomes a series that grows with time.
G. Farrel Kellum
G. Farrel Kellum

G. Kellum challenges the rear view perspective of artistic expression and dives into the world of urban aesthetics, as we…

G. Kellum challenges the rear view perspective of artistic expression and dives into the world of urban aesthetics, as we know it. It also explores the possibilities present in spiritual and psychological…

G. Kellum challenges the rear view perspective of artistic expression and dives into the world of urban aesthetics, as we know it. It also explores the possibilities present in spiritual and psychological practices. Look…

Peter Cunicelli
Peter Cunicelli
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