Asian Arts Going Green

Posted by Erica Minutella

In the 1980s, while Americans were experimenting with colorful wardrobes and experiencing John Hughes movies for the first time, Taiwan was undergoing an environmental awakening.

As a part of this movement, Taiwanese artists have sought inspiration from the natural materials used in traditional Chinese culture. To celebrate this recent re-exploration of the natural world in art, the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education and the Asian Arts Initiative have partnered with the Taipei Cultural Center in New York City for the exhibition Going Green: New Environmental Art from Taiwan.

The opening reception for Going Green will be held at the Asian Arts Initiative, 1219 Vine Street, on Friday, August 6 from 5:30 – 7:30 pm. A panel discussion will feature visiting Taiwanese artists Chao-chang Lee and Ping-yu Pan, among others.

Guided tours of outdoor installations at the Schuylkill Center, 8480 Hagy’s Mill Road, will take place on Saturday, August 7, 3 – 5 pm. Further works will be on view at Asian Arts. The exhibition will remain on display through August 20. More information can be found by clicking here

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling than about the land as place.” I recognized in this characterization a kindred sensibility that continues to inform my work. I find myself drawn to both the apposition and opposition of natural and human-made elements in landscape photography, and seek to convey the emotional to and fro between timelessness and evanescence.
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling…

Paul Santoleri
Paul Santoleri
Maggie Mills' work investigates the landscape future generations will inherit. Addressing climate change, sprawl, and the exploitation of natural resources, the modern plagues that define our environment.
Maggie Mills
Maggie Mills

Maggie Mills' work investigates the landscape future generations will inherit. Addressing climate change, sprawl, and the…

Maggie Mills' work investigates the landscape future generations will inherit. Addressing climate change, sprawl, and the exploitation of natural resources, the modern plagues that define our environment.…

Maggie Mills' work investigates the landscape future generations will inherit. Addressing climate change, sprawl, and the exploitation of natural resources, the modern plagues that define our environment.…

Marcie Ziskind
Marcie Ziskind
Diane Marimow  is a Philadelphia ceramic artist. Diane's dynamic, abstract totems and wall sculptures are inspired by the movement of marine life.
Diane Marimow
Diane Marimow

Diane Marimow is a Philadelphia ceramic artist. Diane's dynamic, abstract totems and wall sculptures are inspired by the…

Diane Marimow is a Philadelphia ceramic artist. Diane's dynamic, abstract totems and wall sculptures are inspired by the movement of marine life.…

Diane Marimow is a Philadelphia ceramic artist. Diane's dynamic, abstract totems and wall sculptures are inspired by the movement of marine life.…

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