Crane Hall

InLiquid presents experimental installations in the Hall Gallery on the first floor of Crane Arts. This unique hallway space offers artist members an opportunity to explore new directions in their work and the ability to create temporary, site-specific, and/or large scale works.

Wed. - Sat. 12–6pm

1400 N. American St.
1st Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19122

More information about Crane Hall is available here

John Schlesinger
John Schlesinger
Maureen Drdak
Maureen Drdak
Linda Dubin Garfield
Linda Dubin Garfield
As a native of Israel, Dganit grew up in a Kibbutz. She moved with her husband to the US in 1992. After years of creating art as a self-taught artist, she became a full time student at UNC Chapel Hill. Moving to Philadelphia, she earned her BFA with honors from the University of The Arts, and MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Art. Currently, she is working in her studio at the Crane Old School in Philadelphia.
In her work she is pulling from her reservoir of life experiences, memories, intuitive processes, and curiosity to construct a “place”, an environment – a landscape. Within it, she aims to present an idea composed of multiple layers, which focuses not only on the physical “being” of land, but also on land as a source of emotional and psychological mood.
Dganit Zauberman
Dganit Zauberman

As a native of Israel, Dganit grew up in a Kibbutz. She moved with her husband to the US in 1992. After years of creating…

As a native of Israel, Dganit grew up in a Kibbutz. She moved with her husband to the US in 1992. After years of creating art as a self-taught artist, she became a full time student at UNC Chapel Hill.…

As a native of Israel, Dganit grew up in a Kibbutz. She moved with her husband to the US in 1992. After years of creating art as a self-taught artist, she became a full time student at UNC Chapel Hill. Moving to Philadelphia,…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling than about the land as place.” I recognized in this characterization a kindred sensibility that continues to inform my work. I find myself drawn to both the apposition and opposition of natural and human-made elements in landscape photography, and seek to convey the emotional to and fro between timelessness and evanescence.
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons
Geoffrey Ansel Agrons

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for…

In his introduction to "Michael Kenna: A Twenty Year Retrospective", Peter Bunnell explored the notion of the “unheroic landscape,” a term that aptly described the photographer’s “concern for the land more as feeling…

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