Brand It @ Art for the Cash Poor 15

InLiquid’s Art for the Cash Poor 15 celebrates Philadelphia as the City of Makers. This week, we’ll be featuring AFTCP15 participants who ‘brand it’ – artists who invest their work, and the people who wear it or own it, with unforgettable personality and style.

New this year, we’ve invited some of the top Philadelphia Influencers to curate a group of promising artists and designers. We’ve asked a few of these Curators to share their advice on how to brand it: everything from how to present yourself at your next networking opportunity, to the best ways of seeking out gallery representation.

streater

Dom Streater, Project Runway contestant and local designer

As a contestant on Project Runway, what were some of the challenges you faced in crafting your on-camera persona?

I made sure that if I was going to be on the show, that I would 100% be my self. I decided not to create any type of personality. After the show, one of the most common remarks I get from fans its that they loved how genuine I was on the show. I tell them because it was true!

Fashion is such an important part of branding personal identity. If you could give advice to someone approaching an important networking opportunity, what would it be?

I would say be the best version of yourself that you can be. And to BE there and BE interested. One thing I noticed that people tend to do is to only talk to someone because they want something from them. It pays more to be genuinely interested in another person, than pretending to be, just so they can help you.

tackman

Katie Tackman, Curator at Gravy Gallery

What do you look for when approaching a new artist for a show – what makes someone’s work stand out?

As a member of Gravy, I am always looking for new artists to show at our space. We have had a wide variety of photographers show at Gravy because we try not to limit the scope of how photography is supposed to be viewed. We look for artists who mix digital, traditional, installation work, and video. An artist who can bring a personal connection in their work is something that we look for. In this digital age where almost everyone can be a photographer with their phone, we look for artists who have strong ideas behind their images and a strong body of work.

What’s the best advice you can give an artist looking for gallery representation?

I think being a part of the artist community is the best way to figure out what gallery fits with your aesthetic and how you want to portray yourself and your work. By attending gallery openings, First Fridays, artist talks, and other events you can become familiar with which galleries draw the kind of buzz in the community that you want to be part of. I think working collaboratively with your gallery is an important element to selling work and coming up with new ideas on how to get your work out there. It is also important for the gallery to have connections outside Philadelphia. If your gallery makes the effort to bring your work to other cities, art fairs, and has a good online presence, you will have more success and other opportunities will open up for you.

What about looking at work as a collector – what advice would you give to someone new to buying art?

Collecting art in Philadelphia is so fun! Everywhere you look, people are making and selling artwork. Trading with friends is always the best because you don’t have to shell out any money. And your friends will get to show off your artwork to their friends. For someone just starting to collect, I would start small and figure out what you like and fits in your house. Then when you come across a larger piece that you love, you will be more aware of the buying process and how you can incorporate it in your collection.

Join us for Art for the Cash Poor 15, June 14 – 15, noon – 6 pm at Crane Arts. Or buy tickets to the preview party benefiting AIDS Fund, June 13, 5:30 – 9 pm.

Rebecca Schultz makes abstracted landscape paintings and murals inspired by nature; her organic forms reference elements such as rock formations and plants. Her installation work focuses on environmental issues. Much of Rebecca's work has integrated a community engagement process.
Rebecca Schultz
Rebecca Schultz

Rebecca Schultz makes abstracted landscape paintings and murals inspired by nature; her organic forms reference elements…

Rebecca Schultz makes abstracted landscape paintings and murals inspired by nature; her organic forms reference elements such as rock formations and plants. Her installation work focuses on environmental…

Rebecca Schultz makes abstracted landscape paintings and murals inspired by nature; her organic forms reference elements such as rock formations and plants. Her installation work focuses on environmental issues. Much of Rebecca's…

RA Friedman
RA Friedman
My recent works are a break from the painterly images I have made in the past few years. In a search for something more deliberate I changed my painting method and style. It is an abstraction using crosshatching, a technique usually reserved for rendering form and depth I have created an abstract flat image more akin to topography verging on minimalism. The linear hatch marks are made on a matte gradiated background which focuses the viewer on the duality of surface and color. These works are a meditation on labor and time: of coming together and the borders that separate us. The marks are not only creating an aesthetic pattern they are literally the marking of art, and the work that has gone into the piece.
Brian Palmieri
Brian Palmieri

My recent works are a break from the painterly images I have made in the past few years. In a search for something more deliberate…

My recent works are a break from the painterly images I have made in the past few years. In a search for something more deliberate I changed my painting method and style. It is an abstraction using crosshatching,…

My recent works are a break from the painterly images I have made in the past few years. In a search for something more deliberate I changed my painting method and style. It is an abstraction using crosshatching, a technique…

Marjorie Grigonis is a painter who has spent 15 years as an art teacher, a professor at several colleges and universities. Currently she works in her studio in Philadelphia, where she belongs to the 3rd Street Gallery, a co-operative which she supports. In the 70's she was a founding member of an artists co-op in NYC. Her work is abstract, both in painting and drawing. They sometimes combine in mixed media with collage. These works may include fragments from the collection of memorabilia in her studio. Her work has been influenced by travel, Morocco, Mexico, and repeated trips to Japan and Europe
Marjorie Grigonis
Marjorie Grigonis

Marjorie Grigonis is a painter who has spent 15 years as an art teacher, a professor at several colleges and universities.…

Marjorie Grigonis is a painter who has spent 15 years as an art teacher, a professor at several colleges and universities. Currently she works in her studio in Philadelphia, where she belongs to the 3rd…

Marjorie Grigonis is a painter who has spent 15 years as an art teacher, a professor at several colleges and universities. Currently she works in her studio in Philadelphia, where she belongs to the 3rd Street Gallery, a…

Terri received her MFA from the University of the Arts and her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design. She currently teaches a variety of Studio Arts courses at The Agnes Irwin School, in Rosemont, PA.
Terri Saulin
Terri Saulin

Terri received her MFA from the University of the Arts and her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design. She currently teaches…

Terri received her MFA from the University of the Arts and her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design. She currently teaches a variety of Studio Arts courses at The Agnes Irwin School, in Rosemont, PA.…

Terri received her MFA from the University of the Arts and her BFA from Moore College of Art and Design. She currently teaches a variety of Studio Arts courses at The Agnes Irwin School, in Rosemont, PA.…

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