Artist Behind the Art: Andrea Caldarise & Rebecca Jacob

Get to know member artists Andrea Caldarise & Rebecca Jacob, in the studio and beyond. We asked about their process, interests, hidden talents, and — dare we say — favorite animals! 

Andrea Caldarise in her home studio
ft. Deli the pug

Rebecca Jacob

 

What are your studio rituals?

Caldarise: Keeping a daily drawing-thought journal, and I like to do small collages from pieces of paper I find along the way. It jump starts the studio day.

Jacob: That’s top secret information.


What’s something bizarre most people don’t know about you?

Caldarise: Strangers often feel the urge to confide in me. This happens frequently and I always listen to the very end, or to my subway stop- whichever comes first.  

Jacob: I am a closet poet.

 

What color do you think you speak in?

Caldarise: Teal and variations of phthalo blue.

Jacob: Blue. Blue is commonly associated with harmony, faithfulness, confidence, distance, infinity, the imagination, cold, and sometimes with sadness…pretty much the gamut of how I feel about my work.


What’s your least favorite medium?

Caldarise: It used to be acrylic, but then we became friends last year. We’re at a mutual understanding point- he knows that oil is my soul mate, but steps in when needed. Now my least favorite medium is colored pencils.

Jacob: Acrylic. I used it in art school and loathed it. The smell, the texture and it comes across as hard.

 

Favorite Philly coffee shop?

Caldarise: Rocket Cat was my favorite, but ReAnimator is next best. 

Jacob: The original La Colombe on Rittenhouse Square.

 

Parakeets or sugar gliders?

Caldarise: Sugar gliders.   

Jacob: Neither.

 

What’s the most important thing for an artist to do?

Calarise: Conquer the fear of the white paper, and even if you’re not showing work, you’re still participating in the creative part of yourself if you’re making.

Jacob: Be true to your inner voice.

 

Thanks to both artists for participating.  Be on the lookout for more interviews with our members artists!

Linda Celestian’s colorful paintings and sculptures are abstract interpretations of natural elements with the intention of bringing the power and beauty of nature inside. Working in partnership with the laws of nature she allows paint run and puddle. Her manipulations of materials imitate natural occurrences such as the sky, ice, decay, water, and patterns created by wind and rain. Celestian’s work are based on observations from the ocean to the smallest fungus growths found on dead trees. The emphasis on fluidity and natural markings brings a fresh and earthy quality to the work. She enjoys exploring natural techniques to sculpt her fiber creations, including nuno felting, shibori dyeing, and rust dyeing. Silk has been her preferred material because of its diaphanous qualities. Small sculptures are stitched to linen circles like specimens and can be installed as collections. Larger components are suspended to create variable aerial compositions. These pieces can command a space while concurrently feeling weightless and free-floating.
Linda Celestian

Linda Celestian’s colorful paintings and sculptures are abstract interpretations of natural elements with the intention of…

Linda Celestian’s colorful paintings and sculptures are abstract interpretations of natural elements with the intention of bringing the power and beauty of nature inside. Working in partnership with the…

Linda Celestian’s colorful paintings and sculptures are abstract interpretations of natural elements with the intention of bringing the power and beauty of nature inside. Working in partnership with the laws of nature she…

My artwork talks quietly about the underlying significance of the domestic sphere on artist production. It argues for the relevance of craft, specifically ceramics and fiber arts, by creating a conversation between the two mediums. Displaying a fascination with the way fiber marks clay, my ceramics exhibit just how subtle those marks can be.
Jennifer Johnson

My artwork talks quietly about the underlying significance of the domestic sphere on artist production. It argues for the…

My artwork talks quietly about the underlying significance of the domestic sphere on artist production. It argues for the relevance of craft, specifically ceramics and fiber arts, by creating a conversation…

My artwork talks quietly about the underlying significance of the domestic sphere on artist production. It argues for the relevance of craft, specifically ceramics and fiber arts, by creating a conversation between the two…

Brooke Lanier creates colorful, detailed, meditative watercolor and oil paintings of interactions between nature and architecture.  They combine elements of figurative and abstract painting.
Brooke Lanier

Brooke Lanier creates colorful, detailed, meditative watercolor and oil paintings of interactions between nature and architecture.…

Brooke Lanier creates colorful, detailed, meditative watercolor and oil paintings of interactions between nature and architecture. They combine elements of figurative and abstract painting.…

Brooke Lanier creates colorful, detailed, meditative watercolor and oil paintings of interactions between nature and architecture. They combine elements of figurative and abstract painting.…

Sarah A. Myers is an InLiquid artist member
Sarah A. Myers

Sarah A. Myers is an InLiquid artist member…

Sarah A. Myers is an InLiquid artist member…

Sarah A. Myers is an InLiquid artist member…

I Found My Voice Through Art. As women in a patriarchal society, we often stick to our roles until we can’t anymore. WE WAKE UP!   We feel different. The world looks like a different place. We breathe the air like it wasn’t there before. I come from a long line of activists and art lovers. My grandmother was in the Red army in Russia, immigrated here and marched with the suffragettes. My mother was a Democratic committee woman in a Republican neighborhood getting doors slammed in her face. My art reflects and represents current events in performing arts and politics. People in the news inspire me... their movement, their expression, their passion for change. Look at the eyes of my portraits. What do they see?  What have they seen?  What are they feeling?   Happiness, sadness, fear, defiance, courage... each has their own story. My paintings are like family members. There is an emotional part of me in every painting. When they sell, I feel a loss. I go back and look at the images to keep them close.
Barbara Shelly

I Found My Voice Through Art. As women in a patriarchal society, we often stick to our roles until we can’t anymore. WE WAKE…

I Found My Voice Through Art. As women in a patriarchal society, we often stick to our roles until we can’t anymore. WE WAKE UP! We feel different. The world looks like a different place. We breathe…

I Found My Voice Through Art. As women in a patriarchal society, we often stick to our roles until we can’t anymore. WE WAKE UP! We feel different. The world looks like a different place. We breathe the air like it wasn’t…

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