Artist Behind the Art: Andrea Caldarise & Rebecca Jacob

Get to know member artists Andrea Caldarise & Rebecca Jacob, in the studio and beyond. We asked about their process, interests, hidden talents, and — dare we say — favorite animals! 

Andrea Caldarise in her home studio
ft. Deli the pug

Rebecca Jacob

 

What are your studio rituals?

Caldarise: Keeping a daily drawing-thought journal, and I like to do small collages from pieces of paper I find along the way. It jump starts the studio day.

Jacob: That’s top secret information.


What’s something bizarre most people don’t know about you?

Caldarise: Strangers often feel the urge to confide in me. This happens frequently and I always listen to the very end, or to my subway stop- whichever comes first.  

Jacob: I am a closet poet.

 

What color do you think you speak in?

Caldarise: Teal and variations of phthalo blue.

Jacob: Blue. Blue is commonly associated with harmony, faithfulness, confidence, distance, infinity, the imagination, cold, and sometimes with sadness…pretty much the gamut of how I feel about my work.


What’s your least favorite medium?

Caldarise: It used to be acrylic, but then we became friends last year. We’re at a mutual understanding point- he knows that oil is my soul mate, but steps in when needed. Now my least favorite medium is colored pencils.

Jacob: Acrylic. I used it in art school and loathed it. The smell, the texture and it comes across as hard.

 

Favorite Philly coffee shop?

Caldarise: Rocket Cat was my favorite, but ReAnimator is next best. 

Jacob: The original La Colombe on Rittenhouse Square.

 

Parakeets or sugar gliders?

Caldarise: Sugar gliders.   

Jacob: Neither.

 

What’s the most important thing for an artist to do?

Calarise: Conquer the fear of the white paper, and even if you’re not showing work, you’re still participating in the creative part of yourself if you’re making.

Jacob: Be true to your inner voice.

 

Thanks to both artists for participating.  Be on the lookout for more interviews with our members artists!

Sociological, figurative oil paintings of crowds by Philadelphia artist Mary Henderson.
Mary Henderson
Mary Henderson

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Sociological, figurative oil paintings of crowds by Philadelphia artist Mary Henderson.…

Sociological, figurative oil paintings of crowds by Philadelphia artist Mary Henderson.…

My art is a psychological diary of my personal translation of the individual’s journey through life. It is a kind of fairytale; a story that teaches, both symbolic and narrative.
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Rochelle Dinkin

My art is a psychological diary of my personal translation of the individual’s journey through life. It is a kind of fairytale;…

My art is a psychological diary of my personal translation of the individual’s journey through life. It is a kind of fairytale; a story that teaches, both symbolic and narrative. …

My art is a psychological diary of my personal translation of the individual’s journey through life. It is a kind of fairytale; a story that teaches, both symbolic and narrative. …

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Kirby Fredendall

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I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the…

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Cassidy Argo
Lonnie Graham is a Pew Fellow and Professor at Pennsylvania State University. He is former director of Photography at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, an urban arts organization dedicated to arts and education for at risk youth. There, Graham developed innovative pilot projects merging Arts and Academics, which were ultimately cited by, then, First Lady Hillary Clinton as a National Model for Arts Education.
Lonnie Graham
Lonnie Graham

Lonnie Graham is a Pew Fellow and Professor at Pennsylvania State University. He is former director of Photography at Manchester…

Lonnie Graham is a Pew Fellow and Professor at Pennsylvania State University. He is former director of Photography at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, an urban arts organization…

Lonnie Graham is a Pew Fellow and Professor at Pennsylvania State University. He is former director of Photography at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, an urban arts organization dedicated to arts…

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