Glassphemy! Comes to Philadelphia

Posted by Erica Minutella
What do bulletproof glass, broken beer bottles, and vacant lots have in common? While your first inclination may be to associate these things with staging straight out of a murder scene from Law and Order, David Belt, of the design firm Macro Sea, may soon have you thinking otherwise.

His new Brooklyn project Glassphemy! merges recycling initiatives and social experimentation in a 20 by 30 foot art installation featuring a room constructed from steel frames and bulletproof glass. The colossal structure allows visitors standing above the piece to smash beer bottles against the walls, thereby activating a lighting system set to go off in response to the vibrations created by the impact of the bottles.

Originally envisioned during a community design charrette in Philadelphia, Glassphemy! will be returning to the city of its conception, presented by InLiquid and Community Design Collaborative as a part of DesignPhiladelphia, in partnership with KSNAC (Kensington South Neighborhood Advisory Council) and NKCDC (New Kensington Development Corporation). The piece will remain on display in the Crane Arts Building, 1400 N. American Street, from October 12 through 17.

In addition, Glassphemy! will be part of two major events on October 17. From 11 am to 4 pm, the piece will be on view during CAFé, the Community Arts Festival presented by InLiquid at Crane Arts. Immediately afterward, it will act as the site for DesignPhiladelphia’s official closing party.

Samantha Nicole Billig
Samantha Nicole Billig
Mehgan Abdel-Moneim
Mehgan Abdel-Moneim
I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the slow movement of rain laden clouds. Areas of sky, water, and land are knit together with brushstrokes to represent their seamless interaction under the common conditions of weather and time. In my acid etched tin pieces, areas of watery marks are left visible to suggest the underlying layers of the landscape. I  do not strive to recreate the particulars of  places that inspire me, but rather the timelessness of the elements of light, weather, and geometries that inform them. My work is not about how the landscape looks as much as about how the landscape makes me feel. I try to create an image that allows the viewer to engage with it in such a way as to invite similar introspection.
Kirby Fredendall
Kirby Fredendall

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks…

I enjoy the manipulation of materials and how process itself contributes to the life and form of the image. Dramatic, gestural lines describe the play of light and wind across the water, while softer marks add life to the…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.
Stan Smokler
Stan Smokler

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.…

Stan Smokler has developed a unique palette, applying industrial cast-offs, "found objects" to create scuptures which deliberately deny their past history in order to serve a new formal purpose.…

Mollie Schaidt
Mollie Schaidt
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